All posts tagged: coeliac disease

Another day, another hospital appointment.

I realised this week that I have been asking doctors for answers for almost two years. As I have written about before, even though I stick religiously to the gluten-free diet, I have ongoing health problems that seemingly cannot be explained by coeliac disease. For a while I worried that it was all in my head, but I have since found countless stories from other coeliacs on Facebook, Twitter and online forums that chime with my experience. At this point it is likely that as well as coeliac disease, I also have IBS, or SIBO, or some other gut-related condition. IBS is the front-runner, and as this can only really be diagnosed through process of elimination, I have had (and am still having) every gut-related test under the sun. I have had a range of advice to help deal with the symptoms. A Dietician put me on the FODMAP diet, a Gastroenterologist recommended I try yoga, mindfulness and cognitive behavioural therapy, another Gastroenterologist prescribed me peppermint oil capsules to ease the pains…though some of these have helped to a degree, …

TMI alert: My endoscopy experience

There is a reason for my radio silence. My brain is only just getting back to normal after that pinnacle of  coeliac fun, the endoscopy. For those of you who don’t know, an endoscopy is a procedure whereby your insides are examined using an endoscope; a long tubey thing with a camera / scraper on the end. Sounds a bit horrifying, no? Read a proper medical description on the NHS page, here. An endoscopy with biopsy (sample collection) is still the gold standard, i.e. the only truly reliable method of coeliac disease diagnosis, so many in the gluten free community will at some stage go through it. There are always lots of questions in the forums and Facebook groups asking what to expect, so I thought I would share my experience. My reason for having an endoscopy this time was not coeliac diagnosis (I was formally diagnosed aged 2), but as more of a check up. I won’t sugar-coat it; the experience was not my favourite. The procedure itself was over within about 10 minutes, but the entire preparation, waiting …

Jimmy Kimmel dismisses the Gluten Free diet as ‘annoying’.

I am baffled. Why would you go to the trouble of eating a gluten-free diet (which as people who actually can’t eat gluten will know, can be literally and metaphorically, a pain in the arse) if you don’t even know what gluten is? The Jimmy Kimmel show did a segment where they asked a few choice (clueless) people on the gluten free diet to explain what exactly gluten is. As a coeliac, there is so much wrong with this. First of all, why are they so set on trying to catch people out? Is eating a gluten free diet really so offensive? Yes, there may be some people who eat gluten free because it is the latest thing to do at the gym, but I would bet money that the majority of people do it for genuine health reasons. Personally I fail to see much cause for it otherwise. I say this as a lifelong coeliac who has embraced the gluten free diet (and writes this blog about the lovely GF food that I find!). Even looking at the positives, …

In the news: ‘Fake-food’ and food labels

As a coeliac, the recent news regarding the the proliferation of ‘fake-food’ worries me. This article from The Guardian details various horrid (barely) edibles including ‘meat emulsion’ and ‘cheese analogue’ that are secretly added to our food, but what really bothers me is the claim that a third of food products tested in a West Yorkshire sample, were incorrectly labelled. A third.  People like me who have coeliac disease rely on food labels. I check the label of every single thing I eat. Every day. For life. I need food companies to label their produce honestly and accurately, so that I can minimise risk to myself by avoiding gluten, which as readers of this blog will likely know, is like poison to coeliacs. Although the article doesn’t specifically mention gluten, it does make you wonder how much you can trust food labels, especially as wheatflour is an ingredient that is often used to bulk out cheaper processed products. This is purely my speculation; I would be interested if anyone knows anything more about this. The article …

COELIAC DISEASE IS NOT A FAD DIET!

Paul Hollywood has just alienated a huge chunk of Bake Off fans. His ill-informed comments about coeliac disease have angered the coeliac community, and have been spread around gluten-free forums, Facebook groups and the blog community. The baker stated that he is ‘skeptical about this whole coeliac thing’ and seemed to suggest that people are often misdiagnosed and should buy better bread as a solution. ARGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH. First of all, I would have hoped that as someone who works with food, he would have at least a passing knowledge of food intolerances and allergies. Second of all, WTF?!? Does he think that people eat a gluten-free diet for fun? Although you can (and I do) eat very well on a gluten-free diet and there are many fantastic products available now, it is not the easy or cheap option, and given the choice, I imagine most would rather not have to worry about what they eat. Paul, if you’re reading, please take a look at the Coeliac UK website (yes, an actual charity for all those fake …

wholefoods

The Promised Land: WHOLEFOODS.

Wholefoods is fast becoming a favourite of mine. The chilled out and homely atmosphere, the luxury organics, and most of all the great selection of gluten-free foods. It is way too pricey for the weekly shop, but Wholefoods is lovely to pop in for a treat. The Piccadilly branch is open until 9pm so if like me you are often in town after work, it can be convenient for finding a quick meal on the way home. There is a tempting array of pre-cooked meals, with a secret canteen upstairs. The store is a model for aspirational living, aimed at the busy, well off and health-conscious. Wholefoods stocks some of my favourite products that you don’t always see on the high street – Amisa pizza bases, Bakery on Main granolas, almost the full range of Montezuma chocolates. The big supermarkets will generally have cheaper GF options, but for these especially good things I am willing to make the trip and pay that bit extra (though still not £4.50 for a loaf of bread – looking …